Der syrische Bürgerkrieg

In deutschsprachigen Medien findet man wenige Hintergründe über den Konflikt in Syrien, was einer der Gründe ist, warum ich angelsächsische Medien bevorzuge. (Was soll man lesen?). Einen ausgezeichneten Überblick über den Konflikt in Syrien, inklusive Einbettung in den historischen Kontext, liefert Max Rodenbeck in The Agony of Syria (NYRB No. 59).

Syria, too, has experienced sinister symmetries. Soon after France grabbed the territory as a share of its spoils from World War I, an insurrection among the proud Druze of the Houran region in the south quickly spread elsewhere. The colonial government countered this challenge with a mix of sweet propaganda and extreme violence. Depicting their foes as sectarian fanatics, the French posed as patrons of progress and as the noble guarantors of peace between Syria’s diverse sects. Yet they also worked hard to sharpen the schism they warned of. Arming and empowering favored groups, they brutalized others with summary executions, the burning of crops, and the razing of villages.

The counterinsurgency culminated with a brazen demonstration of destructive power that effectively terrorized Syria’s propertied class into submission. In October 1925 French artillery and aircraft bombarded Damascus for two days, leaving 1,500 dead and much of the Syrian capital in ruins; the large, incongruously grid-patterned section of the Old City known simply as al-Hariqa—The Fire—today serves as a memorial to that conflagration. In May 1945, French forces again shelled Damascus indiscriminately, killing more than six hundred people in what proved a vain attempt to reassert control following the end of World War II.

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *

  • RSS Feed for Posts
  • RSS Feed for Comments
  • Twitter
  • XING
  • Facebook

Kategorien

„Die Presse“ meint:

"Aber das Internet ist nicht schuld daran, dass Zeitungen reihenweise ihre Literaturseiten „gesundschrumpfen“. Vielmehr hat es das Monopol der traditionellen Medien auf seriöse Literaturkritik gebrochen. Blogs wie die „Notizen“ des promovierten österreichischen Literaturwissenschaftlers Christian Köllerer (koellerer.net) zeigen: Es gibt genug Qualität, man muss sie nur suchen."
(5. Januar 2013)

Aktuell in Arbeit

Tweets